AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (2024)

Table of Contents
Questions 1–4 refer to the passage below. The author’s point of view regarding the above passage can best be categorized as: Using the above passage, which of the following conclusions can be drawn? Which of the following factors impacted the supply and cost of labor in the 14th century? Which of the following answers best describes the type of forced labor described in the above passage? Questions 5–9 refer to the passage below. Which of the following did the Bantu people help to spread throughout Africa? Which of the following best describes Jan Vansina's argument regarding the spread of Bantu languages? According to Jan Vansina, the traditional view of the Bantu expansion is flawed because it: Which historical thinking skill is primarily demonstrated in Jan Vansina's analysis of the Bantu expansion? Vansina's argument about the Bantu expansion most directly challenges which of the following historical narratives? Questions 10–14 refer to the image below. Angkor Wat's transition from a Hindu to a Buddhist temple best illustrates which of the following historical processes? The architectural design of Angkor Wat reflects the influence of which of the following cultural or religious concepts? Which of the following best describes the significance of Angkor Wat in the context of world history? The construction of Angkor Wat primarily utilized which of the following resources? The construction of Angkor Wat during the 12th century most directly reflects which of the following aspects of the Khmer Empire? Questions 15–19 refer to the passage below. Cultivation of crops mentioned in the excerpt was made possible by The techniques mentioned in the excerpt align with which practice of the Song dynasty? The Emperor Zhengzong's interest in acquiring Champa rice and Indian green lentils as described in the excerpt most directly reflects which of the following broader historical trends during the Song Dynasty? The actions of Emperor Zhengzong in sending envoys to acquire new crop varieties best illustrate which of the following aspects of the Song Dynasty's foreign policy? The excerpt's reference to the emperor calling ministers to taste the harvest and compose poems most directly reflects which aspect of Song Dynasty culture? Questions 20–24 refer to the image below. The architectural feature of a minaret, often found in mosques, primarily served which of the following purposes in early Islamic communities? The spread of mosque architecture with features like minarets across different regions illustrates which of the following historical processes in the early Islamic period? The construction of mosques with minarets during the early Islamic period most directly reflects which of the following aspects of Islamic society? In the context of early Islamic history, the construction of mosques with distinctive features like minarets in newly conquered lands was most likely intended to: The architectural designs of early Islamic mosques, including the use of minarets, were influenced by which of the following? Questions 25–29 refer to the image below. The image of Maria, Countess of Bearn, swearing homage to King Alfonso II most directly illustrates which of the following features of medieval European political structures? The presence of a female figure like Maria, Countess of Bearn, in a position of authority in the illustration most likely indicates which of the following about medieval European societies? The act of swearing homage, as depicted in the illustration, was most directly related to which of the following aspects of medieval society? In the context of the 12th century, the production of a manuscript for the Royal Court of Aragon, as seen in the illustration, most likely reflects which of the following? The illustration of Maria, Countess of Bearn, swearing homage to King Alfonso II is best used as historical evidence to illustrate which of the following? References

Question 1

Questions 1–4 refer to the passage below.

“At the time, there happened great disturbances among the lower ranks of people, by which England was nearly ruined. Never was a country in such jeopardy, and all because some commoners sought to claim liberties to which they were not entitled. It is customary in England, as in other countries, for the nobility to have great privileges over the commoners, who are bound by law and custom to plow the lands of nobles, to harvest the grain, to carry it home to the barn, and to perform various other services for their lords.

The evil-disposed in these districts began to rise, saying they were too severely oppressed; that at the beginning of the world there were no slaves, and that no one ought to be treated as such… This they would not longer bear, but had determined to be free, and if they labored for their lords, they wanted to be paid for it. A crazy priest in the country of Kent, called John Ball, who for his absurd preaching, had been thrice confined in prison, inflamed those ideas. He would say: ‘Are we not all descended from the same parents, Adam and Eve? And what can the lords show, or what reasons give, why they should be more the masters than ourselves?’”

—Jean Froissart, French chronicler, late 1300s

The author’s point of view regarding the above passage can best be categorized as:

A

Critical of the peasant class

B

Indifferent to the peasant class

C

Sympathetic to the peasant class

D

Sympathetic to the nobility

Question 1 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). While the passage never specifies the subject, the reader can infer that the “lower ranks” refers to the peasant class. Context clues indicate that the author has a negative or critical view towards the peasant class. Even though we may infer that the author is sympathetic to the nobility, this passage is more focused on the peasant class than defending the nobility.

Question 2

“At the time, there happened great disturbances among the lower ranks of people, by which England was nearly ruined. Never was a country in such jeopardy, and all because some commoners sought to claim liberties to which they were not entitled. It is customary in England, as in other countries, for the nobility to have great privileges over the commoners, who are bound by law and custom to plow the lands of nobles, to harvest the grain, to carry it home to the barn, and to perform various other services for their lords.

The evil-disposed in these districts began to rise, saying they were too severely oppressed; that at the beginning of the world there were no slaves, and that no one ought to be treated as such… This they would not longer bear, but had determined to be free, and if they labored for their lords, they wanted to be paid for it. A crazy priest in the country of Kent, called John Ball, who for his absurd preaching, had been thrice confined in prison, inflamed those ideas. He would say: ‘Are we not all descended from the same parents, Adam and Eve? And what can the lords show, or what reasons give, why they should be more the masters than ourselves?’”

—Jean Froissart, French chronicler, late 1300s

Using the above passage, which of the following conclusions can be drawn?

A

Peasants used religious beliefs to justify their actions

B

The clergy supported the actions of peasants

C

Peasant uprisings happened more frequently in England than in other areas of the world

D

Peasants disagreed with wage labor

Question 2 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). While the author of this passage was based in France, there is no indication that peasant uprisings happened more frequently in England than the rest of the world. Even though the text mentions one clergy person, it does not state that the entire institution supported peasants. Thus, the most plausible answer is that peasants used religious beliefs (such as discussing how things were "at the beginning of the world") to justify their actions.

Question 3

“At the time, there happened great disturbances among the lower ranks of people, by which England was nearly ruined. Never was a country in such jeopardy, and all because some commoners sought to claim liberties to which they were not entitled. It is customary in England, as in other countries, for the nobility to have great privileges over the commoners, who are bound by law and custom to plow the lands of nobles, to harvest the grain, to carry it home to the barn, and to perform various other services for their lords.

The evil-disposed in these districts began to rise, saying they were too severely oppressed; that at the beginning of the world there were no slaves, and that no one ought to be treated as such… This they would not longer bear, but had determined to be free, and if they labored for their lords, they wanted to be paid for it. A crazy priest in the country of Kent, called John Ball, who for his absurd preaching, had been thrice confined in prison, inflamed those ideas. He would say: ‘Are we not all descended from the same parents, Adam and Eve? And what can the lords show, or what reasons give, why they should be more the masters than ourselves?’”

—Jean Froissart, French chronicler, late 1300s

Which of the following factors impacted the supply and cost of labor in the 14th century?

A

Famine

B

Disease

C

Capitalism

D

Migration

Question 3 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The Black Plague was the greatest cause of death that Europe had ever seen by the 14th century. Even though famines and migration took place, disease explains why labor shortages existed. Capitalism was not a development in Europe until the Industrial Revolution.

Question 4

“At the time, there happened great disturbances among the lower ranks of people, by which England was nearly ruined. Never was a country in such jeopardy, and all because some commoners sought to claim liberties to which they were not entitled. It is customary in England, as in other countries, for the nobility to have great privileges over the commoners, who are bound by law and custom to plow the lands of nobles, to harvest the grain, to carry it home to the barn, and to perform various other services for their lords.

The evil-disposed in these districts began to rise, saying they were too severely oppressed; that at the beginning of the world there were no slaves, and that no one ought to be treated as such… This they would not longer bear, but had determined to be free, and if they labored for their lords, they wanted to be paid for it. A crazy priest in the country of Kent, called John Ball, who for his absurd preaching, had been thrice confined in prison, inflamed those ideas. He would say: ‘Are we not all descended from the same parents, Adam and Eve? And what can the lords show, or what reasons give, why they should be more the masters than ourselves?’”

—Jean Froissart, French chronicler, late 1300s

Which of the following answers best describes the type of forced labor described in the above passage?

A

Indentured servitude

B

Military conscription

C

Serfdom

D

Slavery

Question 4 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Operating under a feudal system, serfdom describes the status of most peasants in pre-industrial Europe. Serfs were tied to the land. Unlike slavery, peasants could not be sold and traded individually. Military conscription implies a draft to service. Serfdom was most similar to indentured servitude, with the exception of manorialism and the feudal system.

Question 5

Questions 5–9 refer to the passage below.

“Scholars have been mesmerized by the huge extent of the present distribution of Bantu languages and could think of only a single process, an equally huge human migration, ‘the Bantu expansion,’ to explain it… [This] scenario is fatally flawed, however, for two reasons. First it fell prey to the illusion that only a migration could fit the evidence… [But] a language can spread without involving the migration of any communities. The second fatal error was to collapse a history that encompassed the developments of one to several millennia into a single migration event. The evidence shows that many different dispersals of single languages succeeded each other at different times, not continuously.”

—Jan Vansina, New Linguistic Evidence and ‘the Bantu Expansion,’ 1995

Which of the following did the Bantu people help to spread throughout Africa?

A

Writing systems

B

Architecture

C

Agricultural techniques

D

Religious views

Question 5 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Large groups of Bantu people were able to use technologies to clear forests and rocky terrain. Clearing the ground and burning stumps further made the land arable.

Question 6

“Scholars have been mesmerized by the huge extent of the present distribution of Bantu languages and could think of only a single process, an equally huge human migration, ‘the Bantu expansion,’ to explain it… [This] scenario is fatally flawed, however, for two reasons. First it fell prey to the illusion that only a migration could fit the evidence… [But] a language can spread without involving the migration of any communities. The second fatal error was to collapse a history that encompassed the developments of one to several millennia into a single migration event. The evidence shows that many different dispersals of single languages succeeded each other at different times, not continuously.”

—Jan Vansina, New Linguistic Evidence and ‘the Bantu Expansion,’ 1995

Which of the following best describes Jan Vansina's argument regarding the spread of Bantu languages?

A

The Bantu languages spread primarily through trade networks

B

The spread of Bantu languages was a result of a single, large-scale migration

C

The Bantu languages were imposed by colonial powers in Africa

D

The spread of Bantu languages involved multiple dispersals over a long period

Question 6 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). Jan Vansina challenges the traditional view that the spread of Bantu languages was due to a single, large-scale migration. He argues that the language spread through multiple dispersals over an extended period, emphasizing the complexity and duration of the process.

“Scholars have been mesmerized by the huge extent of the present distribution of Bantu languages and could think of only a single process, an equally huge human migration, ‘the Bantu expansion,’ to explain it… [This] scenario is fatally flawed, however, for two reasons. First it fell prey to the illusion that only a migration could fit the evidence… [But] a language can spread without involving the migration of any communities. The second fatal error was to collapse a history that encompassed the developments of one to several millennia into a single migration event. The evidence shows that many different dispersals of single languages succeeded each other at different times, not continuously.”

—Jan Vansina, New Linguistic Evidence and ‘the Bantu Expansion,’ 1995

According to Jan Vansina, the traditional view of the Bantu expansion is flawed because it:

A

Overlooks the role of environmental factors in language spreading

B

Assumes that language spreading must involve physical migration of communities

C

Ignores the influence of European colonization on African languages

D

Underestimates the impact of trade on cultural diffusion

Question 7 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). Vansina criticizes the traditional view for assuming that the spread of a language necessitates the physical migration of people. He suggests that languages can spread without significant community migration, indicating other mechanisms like cultural interaction or influence.

Question 8

“Scholars have been mesmerized by the huge extent of the present distribution of Bantu languages and could think of only a single process, an equally huge human migration, ‘the Bantu expansion,’ to explain it… [This] scenario is fatally flawed, however, for two reasons. First it fell prey to the illusion that only a migration could fit the evidence… [But] a language can spread without involving the migration of any communities. The second fatal error was to collapse a history that encompassed the developments of one to several millennia into a single migration event. The evidence shows that many different dispersals of single languages succeeded each other at different times, not continuously.”

—Jan Vansina, New Linguistic Evidence and ‘the Bantu Expansion,’ 1995

Which historical thinking skill is primarily demonstrated in Jan Vansina's analysis of the Bantu expansion?

A

Comparison

B

Causation

C

Continuity and Change

D

Contextualization

Question 8 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Vansina's analysis exemplifies the historical thinking skill of continuity and change. He challenges the traditional narrative of a single migration event, proposing instead a more nuanced view that recognizes the continuous and changing nature of language spread over millennia.

Question 9

“Scholars have been mesmerized by the huge extent of the present distribution of Bantu languages and could think of only a single process, an equally huge human migration, ‘the Bantu expansion,’ to explain it… [This] scenario is fatally flawed, however, for two reasons. First it fell prey to the illusion that only a migration could fit the evidence… [But] a language can spread without involving the migration of any communities. The second fatal error was to collapse a history that encompassed the developments of one to several millennia into a single migration event. The evidence shows that many different dispersals of single languages succeeded each other at different times, not continuously.”

—Jan Vansina, New Linguistic Evidence and ‘the Bantu Expansion,’ 1995

Vansina's argument about the Bantu expansion most directly challenges which of the following historical narratives?

A

The impact of European imperialism on African societies

B

The oversimplification of African historical processes into single events

C

The role of African societies in the global trade networks

D

The influence of environmental changes on African migrations

Question 9 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). Vansina's critique is aimed at the tendency to oversimplify complex African historical processes, such as the spread of Bantu languages, into single, monolithic events. He advocates for a more nuanced understanding that acknowledges the multifaceted and prolonged nature of such historical developments.

Question 10

Questions 10–14 refer to the image below.

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (1)

Angkor Wat's transition from a Hindu to a Buddhist temple best illustrates which of the following historical processes?

A

The decline of religious institutions in Southeast Asia

B

The syncretism and adaptability of religious practices in the region

C

The dominance of Hinduism over Buddhism in Southeast Asia

D

The impact of European colonization on Asian religious structures

Question 10 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). Angkor Wat's transition from Hinduism to Buddhism demonstrates the fluidity and adaptability of religious practices in Southeast Asia. This change reflects a broader pattern of religious syncretism, where different religious traditions influence each other and coexist.

Question 11

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (2)

The architectural design of Angkor Wat reflects the influence of which of the following cultural or religious concepts?

A

Hindu cosmology and the representation of Mount Meru

B

Islamic architectural principles

C

Buddhist concepts of minimalism and simplicity

D

European Gothic architectural styles

Question 11 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). Angkor Wat's design is heavily influenced by Hindu cosmology, particularly the representation of Mount Meru, which is considered the home of the gods in Hindu mythology. The temple's central quincunx of towers symbolizes the peaks of Mount Meru.

Question 12

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (3)

Which of the following best describes the significance of Angkor Wat in the context of world history?

A

It represents the peak of European colonial architecture in Southeast Asia

B

It is a symbol of the resistance against Islamic expansion in Asia

C

It exemplifies the cultural and religious zenith of the Khmer Empire

D

It demonstrates the influence of Chinese architectural styles in Southeast Asia

Question 12 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Angkor Wat is a testament to the cultural, religious, and architectural achievements of the Khmer Empire. It symbolizes the empire's zenith and its significant role in the region's history, particularly in terms of religious and cultural development.

Question 13

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (4)

The construction of Angkor Wat primarily utilized which of the following resources?

A

Iron and steel

B

Sandstone and laterite

C

Marble and granite

D

Wood and bamboo

Question 13 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). Angkor Wat was primarily constructed using sandstone and laterite. Sandstone was used for the visible areas of the temple, while laterite was used for the outer wall and hidden structural parts. This choice of materials reflects the natural resources available in the region and the technological capabilities of the Khmer Empire.

Question 14

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (5)

The construction of Angkor Wat during the 12th century most directly reflects which of the following aspects of the Khmer Empire?

A

Military conquests and expansionist policies

B

Economic prosperity and effective state organization

C

Decline in traditional religious practices

D

Influence of neighboring Chinese architectural techniques

Question 14 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The construction of Angkor Wat, a massive and intricate architectural project, reflects the economic prosperity and effective state organization of the Khmer Empire. The ability to mobilize resources, labor, and skilled artisans for such a grand undertaking indicates a well-organized and prosperous state.

Question 15

Questions 15–19 refer to the passage below.

“Emperor Zhengzong, being deeply concerned with agriculture, came to know that the Champa rice was drought resistant and that the green lentils of India were famous for their heavy yield and large seeds. Special envoys, bringing precious things, were dispatched with a view to securing these varieties… When the first harvests were reaped in the autumn, the emperor called his closest ministers to taste them and compose poems for Champa rice and Indian green lentils.”

—Shu Wenying, Buddhist monk, China, eleventh century C.E.

Cultivation of crops mentioned in the excerpt was made possible by

A

The spread of Buddhism

B

Trade communities along the Silk Road

C

New laws created during the Song dynasty

D

Regional trade routes in East and South Asia

Question 15 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). While each answer selection can explain cultural diffusion, the mention of envoys in the text indicates that the regional trade routes led to the cultivation of Indian green lentils in China.

Question 16

“Emperor Zhengzong, being deeply concerned with agriculture, came to know that the Champa rice was drought resistant and that the green lentils of India were famous for their heavy yield and large seeds. Special envoys, bringing precious things, were dispatched with a view to securing these varieties… When the first harvests were reaped in the autumn, the emperor called his closest ministers to taste them and compose poems for Champa rice and Indian green lentils.”

—Shu Wenying, Buddhist monk, China, eleventh century C.E.

The techniques mentioned in the excerpt align with which practice of the Song dynasty?

A

The teachings of Neo Confucianism

B

Sea voyages funded by the state

C

Improvements to the Grand Canal

D

Tribute exchanges with the Mongols

Question 16 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Though all answers discuss policies in the Song Dynasty, the improvements to the Grand Canal most align with regional trade routes.

Question 17

“Emperor Zhengzong, being deeply concerned with agriculture, came to know that the Champa rice was drought resistant and that the green lentils of India were famous for their heavy yield and large seeds. Special envoys, bringing precious things, were dispatched with a view to securing these varieties… When the first harvests were reaped in the autumn, the emperor called his closest ministers to taste them and compose poems for Champa rice and Indian green lentils.”

—Shu Wenying, Buddhist monk, China, eleventh century C.E.

The Emperor Zhengzong's interest in acquiring Champa rice and Indian green lentils as described in the excerpt most directly reflects which of the following broader historical trends during the Song Dynasty?

A

The decline of imperial power and influence

B

The focus on military expansion and conquest

C

The emphasis on agricultural innovation and food security

D

The shift towards isolationist policies

Question 17 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Emperor Zhengzong's efforts to acquire drought-resistant rice and high-yield lentils highlight the Song Dynasty's focus on agricultural innovation. This was a period when Chinese rulers actively sought to improve agricultural productivity and food security, recognizing their importance for the stability and prosperity of the empire.

Question 18

“Emperor Zhengzong, being deeply concerned with agriculture, came to know that the Champa rice was drought resistant and that the green lentils of India were famous for their heavy yield and large seeds. Special envoys, bringing precious things, were dispatched with a view to securing these varieties… When the first harvests were reaped in the autumn, the emperor called his closest ministers to taste them and compose poems for Champa rice and Indian green lentils.”

—Shu Wenying, Buddhist monk, China, eleventh century C.E.

The actions of Emperor Zhengzong in sending envoys to acquire new crop varieties best illustrate which of the following aspects of the Song Dynasty's foreign policy?

A

Aggressive military expansionism

B

Diplomatic engagement and exchange

C

Reliance on tribute from neighboring states

D

Isolationism and avoidance of foreign contact

Question 18 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The dispatch of envoys with precious gifts to secure new crop varieties demonstrates the Song Dynasty's approach to foreign policy, which was characterized by diplomatic engagement and exchange. This policy facilitated cultural and technological exchanges, contributing to the dynasty's prosperity and innovation.

Question 19

“Emperor Zhengzong, being deeply concerned with agriculture, came to know that the Champa rice was drought resistant and that the green lentils of India were famous for their heavy yield and large seeds. Special envoys, bringing precious things, were dispatched with a view to securing these varieties… When the first harvests were reaped in the autumn, the emperor called his closest ministers to taste them and compose poems for Champa rice and Indian green lentils.”

—Shu Wenying, Buddhist monk, China, eleventh century C.E.

The excerpt's reference to the emperor calling ministers to taste the harvest and compose poems most directly reflects which aspect of Song Dynasty culture?

A

The integration of agriculture with cultural and intellectual pursuits

B

The importance of military achievements

C

The dominance of Buddhist practices in state affairs

D

The role of the emperor as a divine figure

Question 19 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). The act of tasting the new crops and composing poems reflects the Song Dynasty's cultural milieu, where agriculture was not only a matter of economic importance but also integrated with intellectual and artistic pursuits. This practice underscores the era's appreciation for the aesthetic and cultural dimensions of everyday life, including food and agriculture.

Question 20

Questions 20–24 refer to the image below.

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (6)

The architectural feature of a minaret, often found in mosques, primarily served which of the following purposes in early Islamic communities?

A

To serve as a defensive structure against invasions

B

To call the faithful to prayer

C

To represent the wealth and power of the ruling caliphate

D

To function as a storage area for religious texts

Question 20 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The primary purpose of a minaret in Islamic architecture is to provide a high place from which the call to prayer (adhan) can be made. This feature is symbolic of the Islamic practice of prayer five times a day and is a distinctive aspect of mosque architecture.

Question 21

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (7)

The spread of mosque architecture with features like minarets across different regions illustrates which of the following historical processes in the early Islamic period?

A

Cultural diffusion through trade and conquest

B

The imposition of religious practices by military conquest

C

The decline of traditional architectural styles

D

The influence of European architectural styles on Islamic culture

Question 21 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). The spread of Islamic architectural features like minarets is a clear example of cultural diffusion, facilitated both by Islamic conquests and extensive trade networks. As Islam spread, so did its cultural and architectural influences, adapting to and incorporating local styles and traditions.

Question 22

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (8)

The construction of mosques with minarets during the early Islamic period most directly reflects which of the following aspects of Islamic society?

A

The central role of commerce and trade

B

The separation of secular and religious authority

C

The influence of nomadic lifestyles

D

The importance of community and public worship in Islam

Question 22 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). The mosque serves as a community center and a place of worship in Islamic society, reflecting the religion's emphasis on communal prayers and gatherings. The minaret, as part of mosque architecture, underscores the importance of public worship and the communal aspects of Islamic practice.

Question 23

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (9)

In the context of early Islamic history, the construction of mosques with distinctive features like minarets in newly conquered lands was most likely intended to:

A

Completely replace local religious practices

B

Serve as a visible symbol of the Islamic faith and community

C

Provide a place for the exclusive use of the ruling elite

D

Facilitate the integration of Islamic law into local governance

Question 23 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The construction of mosques with minarets in newly conquered or converted areas served as a visible and prominent symbol of the presence of Islam and its community. These structures were not just places of worship but also symbols of the new religious and cultural landscape.

Question 24

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (10)

The architectural designs of early Islamic mosques, including the use of minarets, were influenced by which of the following?

A

The direct adoption of Christian church designs

B

The replication of Zoroastrian fire temples

C

The adaptation and synthesis of various regional architectural styles

D

The exclusive use of original, unprecedented designs

Question 24 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). Early Islamic architecture, including mosques, often reflected the adaptation and synthesis of various regional styles that predated Islam. This included influences from Byzantine, Persian, and other local architectural traditions, demonstrating the Islamic world's ability to adapt and integrate diverse cultural elements into its own religious and cultural expressions.

Question 25

Questions 25–29 refer to the image below.

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (11)

The image of Maria, Countess of Bearn, swearing homage to King Alfonso II most directly illustrates which of the following features of medieval European political structures?

A

The absolute power of monarchs over their subjects

B

The role of the Church in governing feudal territories

C

The feudal system of vassals and lords

D

The emergence of democratic institutions in medieval Europe

Question 25 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). The act of swearing homage, as depicted in the image, is a key feature of the feudal system, where vassals (such as Maria, Countess of Bearn) would pledge loyalty and service to a lord (such as King Alfonso II) in exchange for protection and the use of land.

Question 26

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (12)

The presence of a female figure like Maria, Countess of Bearn, in a position of authority in the illustration most likely indicates which of the following about medieval European societies?

A

Women commonly held positions of political power equal to men

B

Noblewomen could play significant roles in feudal politics

C

The illustration is an anomaly and not representative of the time

D

Women's roles were primarily limited to religious settings

Question 26 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). While it was not the norm, noblewomen in medieval Europe could occasionally hold significant roles, especially in managing estates or even in political matters, particularly when male relatives were absent or deceased.

Question 27

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (13)

The act of swearing homage, as depicted in the illustration, was most directly related to which of the following aspects of medieval society?

A

The development of centralized nation-states

B

The rise of merchant guilds and commercial classes

C

The spread of Christianity and its influence on governance

D

The maintenance of social order and hierarchy in feudal systems

Question 27 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). The feudal ceremony of swearing homage was crucial in maintaining the social order and hierarchy within the feudal system. It established clear relationships and obligations between different levels of society, from kings to nobles to knights to peasants.

Question 28

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (14)

In the context of the 12th century, the production of a manuscript for the Royal Court of Aragon, as seen in the illustration, most likely reflects which of the following?

A

The widespread literacy and availability of printed materials

B

The patronage of arts and culture by European monarchies

C

The influence of Islamic culture on European art

D

The dominance of the Church in artistic production

Question 28 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The production of manuscripts, especially for royal courts, reflects the patronage of arts and culture by European monarchies during this period. Such manuscripts were often luxurious items, showcasing the wealth, power, and cultural sophistication of the ruling elite.

Question 29

AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (15)

The illustration of Maria, Countess of Bearn, swearing homage to King Alfonso II is best used as historical evidence to illustrate which of the following?

A

The role of women in medieval military campaigns

B

The artistic styles and techniques of the 12th century

C

The feudal relationships and ceremonies of medieval Europe

D

The economic systems of medieval European kingdoms

Question 29 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). This illustration is a valuable piece of historical evidence for understanding feudal relationships and ceremonies in medieval Europe. It visually depicts the social and political structures of the time, particularly the feudal bonds and rituals that defined the relationships between different ranks of nobility and royalty.

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AP World History Unit 1 Practice Test: The Global Tapestry (2024)

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Introduction: My name is Manual Maggio, I am a thankful, tender, adventurous, delightful, fantastic, proud, graceful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.